Thursday, February 2, 2012

Huh? Really? I don't Believe it.

Is your story believable? I mean really believable.

Take for instance this:

(Okay, this movie was fun to watch, but HISHE makes a good point.)

(That's so awesome) When someone reads your work and they say, "Why didn't (insert name here) just do (insert action here)?"

That's when a writer usually says, "You just don't get it," while shaking head... "I'm a writer, this story can be anyway I want." (No...*uneasy look* I don't know that from experience. *nervous laughing*)

Okay, this is a big mistake (see video above for reference). When someone says a part of your plot won't work, believe them, revise, and move on. Because you want your book to be better.

Have a great week writing everyone! I have to go change that one scene on my book...you know...the one that I thought was cool, but ...my character can't conveniently fly...but it would be cool! Have you ever had to change your plot because something just wasn't working?

15 comments:

J. A. Bennett said...

So many times! Crazy how other people pick up on stuff you miss!

David P. King said...

I love HISHE.

I also love it when people question my character's motives. Always leads to interesting thoughts when you know what's going to happen and they don't. :)

Jolene Perry said...

We ALL have to do that - OR we MUST show the reason for the insane action that moves the plot forward.

Characters doing things I feel are out of character for the obvious purpose of moving forward the plot makes me CRAZY.

Yamile said...

Yes! Many times! My problem is when something makes complete sense in my mind, and even when I read it aloud, but my crit partners don't see. I wish I could just take a picture of the image in my mind, and translate it into words. When is someone going to invent something like that? ;-)

Janet Johnson said...

I have definitely had to make adjustments for this reason. Thank goodness for outside readers who can see those holes!

Jamie Burch said...

I've had to do that, too. I'm sure I'll have to do it again. Good luck with your changes!

Angie said...

Oh, yes. Of course. All the time!

Jennifer Shirk said...

I didn't have change my plot, but I am just recently having to change my hero's conflict. So I'm sifting through the entire manuscript now adding and deleting. But I think it will be worth it. At first, I didn't think it was necessary, but then I realized that if my crit partner felt strongly about it, I should look at it again--which is what I did. :)

Patti said...

I find that when my plot isn't working, it's all about character motivations. Would that character really do that.

Susan R. Mills said...

Yep! I had to change the ending of my latest WIP for that very reason. (It was really more of a tweaking, but still a change.)

Indigo said...

Often! The line usually goes, "You had me until I read this ___ (insert sample of where it got unbelievable).

I've argued they weren't human, I knew my characters better than anyone, etc. In the end a few slight changes is all it takes to cross the line back into believable. We become so comfortable with our characters we assume everyone gets it. (Hugs)Indigo

Nicole Ducleroir said...

I have absolutely realized a plotting left turn was necessary to get things on a better path. Sometimes it's a hard decision -- no, it's always a hard decision -- but the more experienced a writer I become, the more I trust those changes in direction. Great post!

Kate Coursey said...

I do this all the time. I think it's really hard to see your story from an outside perspective.....even if it makes sense to you, it doesn't necessarily make sense to others.

Nichole Giles said...

Yep, all too often. And usually, I end up agreeing with the comments (you know, after I get over the shock that my manuscript isn't perfect!). Good luck for you in finding another way to make it work.

L.T. Elliot said...

I love HISHE. Batman is my favorite. "I'm Batman!" LOL!

It all goes back to that thing you said in a post a long time ago about being teachable. If you are willing to learn things from others, willing to listen, willing to at least weigh it in your own mind (even if you end up disagreeing), I think it will make you a better writer. No writer is an island and critiques are like desperately needed life rafts. Can't do without them.